Posted in Challenges, drama, fantasy, flash fiction, Prose, tragedy, Writing

The Assassin’s Task

It wasn’t easy to make himself look like an ancient wandering priest. It was even harder to talk his way into the mansion, but the young assassin had managed it. The powder he’d slipped into Lord Rowan’s drink would kill him by twilight, and no physician would be able to detect the elusive poison.

The boy felt proud of himself, but also scared. He wasn’t sure whether the leaders of the Order would praise him for completing a task assigned to a more experienced assassin or flog him for disobedience. He contemplated different scenarios as he left the Lord’s land, but since none of them ended in sudden death, the boy deemed it safe to show up on his mentor’s doorstep.

After hearing his student’s story, the elder assassin said,

“You use magic well.”

“I tried my best.”

“You… enjoyed killing him, didn’t you?”

“Why wouldn’t I?”

As the future assassin went to sleep, looking forward to the leaders’ decision, his mind was continuously assaulted by the images of the smiles he’d seen on the faces of Lord Rowan’s children. They didn’t have to kill to be happy, so what was wrong with him?


Written for both the Daily Post prompt and Jane Dougherty’s Microfiction Challenge.

Assassins, magic, and Van Gogh. Never thought that combination would inspire a story.

All comments are welcome!

Advertisements

Author:

Absolutely fantastic procrastinator. Creative, often irrational, hyperactive. Reader, writer, artist, photographer, film-maker, gamer.

17 thoughts on “The Assassin’s Task

  1. You have to wonder don’t you as to what goes on in the mind of an assassin. Do they have moments of regret or is it just a job? I like how you put this together Louise, well done.

    Like

    1. I like exploring their psychology (for some weird reason=D) and it’s always been the matter of a conflicting nature for me. They kill but they enjoy it. Do they fear that enjoyment or do they relish it? A lot of things to think about, you’re right. Thank you for commenting, Michael!

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s